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The anatomy of a score mix #1

As I’m completely snowed under with the current score mix I’m working on, I thought I share the anatomy of this mix. Have to break it into parts as I frankly have no functioning brain at the end of a long day.

Format

It might be different where you live, but here 5.1 is still the major format. Occasionally we encounter other formats, but that’s so rare I wouldn’t mention all of the possibilities. Immersive formats are far away things we only dream of, but never ever met. It might change in the future, but honestly in Europe I think there’s still only very few cinemas and dub stages offer true immersive workflow and experience. There’s some news that the biggest post houses started to upgrade their stages to be able to mix in Dolby Atmos or Barco’s Auro, but I don’t see it’s spreading that fast, so for the time being we seem to stick with 5.1.

It’s important to know your delivery format before you even start to build your mix session because it can lead you to very different bus and session layout that would be extremely hard to change during the mix. Wait, I mean it, really! Starting with an inappropriate format can ruin your work and drag you into an endless re-route, re-do, re-mix cycle. I know it seems like the most obvious thing, yet still so many fall into this trap.

Principles

It’s all about what to do and what not to do. The best is to eliminate any guesswork and have a discussion with the re-recording mixer. This is the only advice I can honestly give. Really. You can endlessly browse every audio forum, try to decipher anyone’s workflow, watch every tutorial videos on Earth and still, the only person who really knows the answer is the re-recording mixer. And to further confuse you, it might be different on every film. So this must be on your checklist.

What you need to know is: are you allowed to use the LFE for certain moments? How to treat the Centre channel? Leave it empty or use it sparingly? These are very important questions which can affect your final mix on the dub stage.

LFE stands for Low Frequency Effects, hence it’s not there to create ample lows for your orchestra. Treat it as a special thing. If you put everything in it, you have a good chance that it’s going to be muted, and for a good reason.

Almost the same with the Centre. This is where the dialogue is the king, period. If you happen to ruin their chances to clearly hear the dialogue, they will eliminate your Centre, again, for a good reason. In a film mix there’s tremendous amount of things they have to balance in order to achieve a nice, good sounding mix, don’t make their life harder, especially if you can make it easier.

This doesn’t mean that you should absolutely avoid using the Centre channel, but my advice is to make sure you’re not putting anything truly important Centre only. If unsure, consult the re-recording guy, even ask for some time on the stage to test your mix, but never ever rely on it as your main anchor.

Stems

Let me start with a common misconception. I’ve heard this numerous times and the misbelief is still very wide spread even amongst professionals. Here it is: “I don’t deliver stems, fullmix is my mix and they shouldn’t change that…

Well, stems are not there to alter your precious mix. Quite the opposite! They are there to preserve your mix as much as possible. Think about this example: you delivered only a fullmix, where a huge taiko drum hit just happen to be at the same spot as an explosion. What would the mixer do with this? Lower your music fullmix in order to carve space so that the explosion is clearly audible and have its intended impact. Now let’s see what happens if you deliver stems. Now they lower only your Percussion stem, which means most of your mix is left intact, only that taiko drum hit suffer, but given the circumstances, that’s understandable. Which is better? Obviously I’d choose the second one.

Delivering stems are the only way to make sure your mix will be preserved as much as possible. Also, this should be discussed with the re-recording mixer. How many stems does he/she want? Too many might put too much on their shoulder, too few or badly organised ones might cripple their chances to affect only the problematic areas.

Don’t forget, this is a collaborative vocation, it’s not about your ego, it’s about the film.